Jan Longone

Jan Longone

Culinary historian

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Longone
Jan Longone is Curator of American Culinary History at Special Collections (SC), Hatcher Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She and her husband Dan, UM Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, have donated their book collections to the University to form the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive (JBLCA).The JBLCA consists of more than 40,000 items including books, ephemera, manuscripts, graphics, menus, serials, maps. Jan is proprietor of The Wine and Food Library, America’s oldest antiquarian culinary bookshop and founder and honorary chair of the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor. In addition to her curatorial duties and her book business, Jan is a writer, lecturer, teacher, consultant, media commentator and collection developer in matters gastronomic.

Jan's favorite cookbooks

Available on ckbk now
American Cookery

American Cookery

By Amelia Simmons

Considered the first American cookbook, with a dozen or more reprints and pirated editions by 1830 and recent facsimiles.

Available on ckbk now
Coming to ckbk soon
The Kentucky Housewife

The Kentucky Housewife

This book is rare and not as well-known as it should be - it is a fine and extensive (456 pages) compilation of Kentucky recipes.

Coming to ckbk soon
Directions for Cookery

Directions for Cookery

By Eliza Leslie

Miss Leslie was the most prolific and most published American cookery authority in the first half of the nineteenth century. In addition to her cookbooks, she authored novels, short stories, works for juveniles, etiquette books, and edited and wrote for numerous magazines. Her Directions (at least 150,000 copies sold) was a longtime best seller and was issued in revised editions. There are modern facsimiles of a number of her books.

Coming to ckbk soon
A Domestic Cook Book

A Domestic Cook Book

A rare item, only one copy known, by an African-American woman. She was a free woman of color and because of her Union sympathies, had to flee the South during the Civil War. She moved to Michigan and planned to return to the South to redeem her property. She was an indomitable spirit: her story is an African-American one and an American one. There is a modern facsimile.

Available on ckbk now
The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book

The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book

By Fannie Merritt Farmer

The late 19th century produced a remarkable group of women who changed American cooking and life (Juliet Corson, Mary Johnson (née Bailey) Lincoln, Maria Parloa, and Sarah Tyson Rorer, among others). This book is among the most popular cookbooks ever published in America. Between its first appearance in 1896 and 1983, it went through twelve editions, more than seventy printings and had sold over three million copies. During the quarter of a century she devoted to teaching the art of cooking in America, she became a national celebrity. She authored many cookbooks, wrote for magazines and journals and produced promotional literature. Many facsimiles and re-dos of her works are available.

Available on ckbk now
The Settlement Cook Book

The Settlement Cook Book

By Lizzie Black Kander

Lizzie Kander founded the first settlement house in Milwaukee. When the Board (male) refused to pay the printing costs ($18.00) for recipe booklets for her cooking classes and suggested that if she wanted to raise the money, she should do it herself. Which she did – most successfully. She served as editor for almost forty years, always revising, expanding and testing recipes. More than two million copies sold in more than forty editions, with money from sales being distributed to all Milwaukee charities for over 100 years. The Wisconsin Historical Society selected this book as one of the most influential volumes in their library of 3.6 million titles. This is a charity fundraising book, a way Ame

Available on ckbk now
The Picayune's Creole Cook Book

The Picayune's Creole Cook Book

By The Times Picayune Publishing Company

First published in 1900 or 1901, there were 17 editions between 1900 and 1985. It went through numerous other editions after that, including some modernized. There are a number of facsimiles. The first few editions are quite scarce. Perhaps you will prefer the post-Prohibition issue which was reprinted from the 5th edition, containing "recipes using wines and liquors customary before Prohibition".