Method

Sieve very dry flour that has been placed in the oven overnight. Pour ¼ garnets of this flour into a saucepan and add 1 glass warm milk, glass yeast, and about glass clarified butter. Mix until smooth, cover with a napkin folded over several times, and set aside in a warm place. When the dough has risen, pour in ¾ glass, or 9 to 11 strained egg yolks and add ¼ glass sugar, ½ teaspoon anise, and salt. Knead thoroughly in a warm place, add another ¼ garnets flour, and knead until the dough pulls away from your hands. Cover and let rise a second time.

When the dough has risen, spread it out on the table, sprinkle lightly with flour, and with your hands stretch it out as thin as possible. Place on a buttered baking sheet dusted with flour, turn up the edges a little all around, and paint with egg whites beaten with sugar. Prick the entire mazurka with a fork and, without letting it rise, place immediately into the oven for 1 hour. When it has browned lightly, cover with paper. After removing from the oven, let it cool, but if it is not very dry, return it to the oven. Then glaze and dry in the oven. Order (velet’)* the oven to be lit as you begin kneading the dough. Instead of icing, the mazurka may be spread with ground almonds mixed with sugar and egg whites. (Use ½ garnets of flour in all.)

*This verb is a reminder that serfs, and later servants, were an integral part of large, wealthy households in nineteenth-century Russia.

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