Method

Lay sour apples on straw until they become juicy, but do not let them rot at all. Chop them very fine with a chopper and extract the juice in a press. In the same manner, chop sweet apples, very ordinary [i.e., no special variety], only without bitterness, and extract the juice in a press. For 2 parts sweet apple juice, add 1 part sour apple juice. Pour into a carboy and let the juice settle on ice for 3–4 days. Then decant carefully without disturbing the sediment and begin to cook the liquid. When the juice begins to thicken, stir it frequently with a wooden spatula so that it does not burn. Cook for a long time until, when it cools on a spoon on ice, it is as thick as fresh honey just removed from the hive. This soy* keeps in bottles for several years. It is used for sauces and is served in either salads or gravies and with veal, turkey, chicken, and beef.

*The word “soy” in this recipe must be understood analogously since this apple syrup, like soy sauce, is savory and keeps well. Its mildly tart flavor, however, obviously differs radically from the salty pungency of the sauce made from fermented soy beans. Naming by analogy is not uncommon in culinary history. Our use of the word “ketchup” which now refers to a thickened, sweetened, and mildly spiced tomato sauce, derives from the Malay kechap which means fermented fish sauce.

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