Method

Stone the cherries, pound several of the pits, and sew the crushed pits into a muslin bag. Add the muslin bag to the fruit so that after the juice has been drained, the broken pits will not prevent the cherries from being used for ginger-breads or fruit purées. Pour a layer of finely sieved sugar into a large jar and cover with a layer of cherries 1½–2 times thicker than the layer of sugar. Continue in this manner, adding alternate layers of sugar and cherries, until the jar is filled. Set the jar in the sun for 3 days for the sugar to dissolve, then drain in a fine sieve. Immediately pour the juice into bottles and cork with the best velvety corks that have been boiled until pliable. Seal with a mixture of half tar and half lard, which will not crack easily. This syrup is a good substitute for fresh cherries. Place the bottles on their side in chests and store on ice until the frost, and thereafter in the wine cellar. This juice is also good to serve for drinks, in which case it should be stored in small bottles. Purée the cherries that remain, bring to a boil, and use for filling pirogs, or for fruit pastilles.

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