228. Roasting

Appears in

A Shilling Cookery for the People

By Alexis Soyer

Published 1854

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Method

Ten pounds of beef will take from two hours to two hours and a half roasting, eighteen inches from a good fire.

Six pounds one hour and a quarter to one hour and a half, fourteen inches from the fire.

Three ribs of beef, boned and rolled (see No. 207), well tied round with paper, will take two hours and a half, eighteen inches from the fire, and only baste once.

If beef is very fat, it does not require basting; if very lean, tie it up in greasy paper, and baste well.

229.

Eight pounds of veal will take from one hour and a half to two hours, eighteen inches from the fire: if stuffed, at least two hours.

Chump, or loin and kidneys, of four pounds, will take one hour and a quarter; baste well.

Six pounds of breast one hour, twelves inches from the fire.

Six pounds of the shoulder or neck the same.

Calf’s heart, stuffed and tied up in paper, three quarters of an hour.

230.

Mutton (leg of eight pounds), will take one hour and a half, eighteen inches from the fire.

Saddle, ten pounds, one hour and a quarter to one hour and a half, eighteen inches, measuring from the flat surface.

Shoulder, one hour and a half.

Loin, one hour and a half.

Breast, three quarters of an hour.

Neck, one hour.

231.

Lamb, according to size, but in the same proportion less than mutton, but ought always to be well done, and placed nearer the fire; if a good fire about fifteen inches from it.

Pork should be well done.

Leg of six pounds, with skin over, two hours, eighteen inches from the fire.

Loin of the same, one hour.

Neck, the same weight, one hour and three-quarters.

Pork rubbed with salt the night previous, and then scraped before roasting, improves the flavour.

In roasting of beef, mutton, lamb, pork, and poultry, place a dripping-pan under the meat, with a little clear dripping or fat, which should be very hot when the meat is basted. A quarter of an hour before serving add half a pint of water to the fat in the dripping-pan; dredge the meat with flour and salt. When the meat is dished up, pour the contents of the pan into a basin, straining it through a gauze sieve kept on purpose; remove all the fat, add a little colouring and salt to the gravy, and pour it into the dish under the meat.

Veal and poultry should have half the quantity of water put in the pan, and that, when strained, added to half a pint of thick melted butter, adding two teaspoonfuls of any sauce for flavour, as Harvey’s, Soyer’s, or ketchup, &c.

Sage and onions to be served with pork.

Mint sauce with lamb.

Currant-jelly with mutton.