Method

For 1 lb coffee use ¼ lb chicory. The coffee should be roasted not in a skillet but in a covered brazier, which should be shaken constantly. It is ready when the beans turn dark chestnut and are covered with moisture. Beware of overcooking. It is better to pound the beans rather than to grind them, and the finer the better. For each cup, use one full teaspoon of coffee blended with chicory. Pour into a flannel bag in a coffee pot, add boiling water measured by the teacup, and set the pot on top of the stove. Remove from the stove when the coffee comes to a boil and immediately add a spoon of cold water. After the coffee has settled, return the pot to the top of the stove. When it begins to boil, set it aside again and add another spoon of cold water. Again let it come to a boil, and again add a spoon of cold water. The fourth time, let it come to a boil, set aside to settle, and then serve.

Or, cook in the oven in an earthenware coffee pot, glazed on both sides. Use coffee water instead of regular water; that is, use water boiled down from the sediment from left-over coffee, adding to it a piece of fish glue or isinglass.* After cooking, let the coffee settle, decant it carefully into another coffee pot, heat, and serve. Heat the cream for coffee in small jugs with lids so a thick membrane will form.

*According to Mrs. Lincoln, one-time head of the Boston Cooking School, “Fish glue or inferior isinglass, which can be purchased at a druggist’s, is a cheap and convenient article to use in clearing coffee. Egg shells should be saved and used for the same purpose. . . . Two or three shells contain albumen sufficient to clear a quart of coffee” (Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln’s Boston Cook Book, J14).

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