French Raised Game Pie

Pâté de Gibier à la Française

Method

Prepare a raised pie paste, and with it line a No. 2 size French raised pie mould to scarcely a quarter of an inch thick; then prepare a farce or mince as follows :—Take ten ounces of veal, twelve ounces of fresh pork, and chop very fine, or pass twice through a mincing machine; season with pepper, salt, a little nutmeg and cayenne, and arrange this on the paste in the mould. Fill in with fillets of pigeon, chicken, or any game you may have, strips of tongue, ham, or bacon, hard boiled yolks of eggs that are masked with chopped parsley and seasoned with pepper and salt, button mushrooms, pistachios, truffles, pâté de foie gras, cockscombs, and any farced birds, such as larks, quails, or ortolans, so as to stand higher than the mould: cover in with more of the farce or mince, and then put a somewhat thinner layer of paste over the top, first wetting the edges of the paste round the mould, press the edges together, and trim off the paste; brush the top lightly over with cold water, stamp out some rounds of the paste and work them into leaves or other pretty designs, and ornament the top of the pie with them; fix a buttered paper round the mould standing some six inches higher than the top of the pie. Bake gently for about two and a half to three hours, taking care that the paste is not browned, as it should be a rich fawn colour when done; when cooked put the pie aside in the mould till it is cold, then remove the top by cutting the paste through round the edge of the mould, and fill up the pie with any nice meat jelly that is not quite set and put aside again till the jelly is quite set then cover the top with some chopped aspic and replace the paste cover. Remove the mould, dish on a paper, and it may be garnished round with aspic jelly. Care must be taken when filling up the mould that the jelly is not too liquid or it will go through the paste. This is excellent as a side dish, or for wedding breakfasts, ball suppers, and, in fact, for use generally.

,