French Receipt for Boiling a Ham

Method

After having soaked, thoroughly cleaned, and trimmed the ham, put over it a little very sweet clean hay, and tie it up in a thin cloth; place it in a ham kettle, a braising pan, or any other vessel as nearly of its size as can be, and cover it with two parts of cold water and one of light white wine (we think the reader will perhaps find cider a good substitute for this); add, when it boils and has been skimmed, four or five carrots, two or three onions, a large bunch of savoury herbs, and the smallest bit of garlic.’ Let the whole simmer gently from four to five hours, or longer should the ham be very large. When perfectly tender, lift it out, take off the rind, and sprinkle over it some fine crumbs, or some raspings of bread mixed with a little finely minced parsley.

Obs.β€”Foreign cooks generally leave hams, braised joints, and various other prepared meats intended to be served cold, to cool down partially in the liquor in which they are cooked; and this renders them more succulent; but for small frugal families the plan does not altogether answer, because the moisture of the surface (which would evaporate quickly if they were taken out quite hot) prevents their keeping well for any length of time. The same objection exists to serving hams laid upon, or closely garnished with savoury jelly (aspic), which becomes much more quickly unfit for table than the hams themselves.

These considerations, which may appear insignificant to some of our readers, will have weight with those who are compelled to regulate their expenses with economy.

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