The Futurist Cookbook

By

Original Publisher
Le Figaro of Paris
Date of publication
1932
ISBN
0141391642

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Recommended by

MiMi Aye

Blogger and cookbook author

The recipes in this book are ridiculous, but it's fascinating to see how what was a joke seem to have permeated into real life. For example, it decreed that there be no more pasta, as it caused lassitude, pessimism and lack of passion - how many people expound carb-free living these days? The recipes in this book are ridiculous, but it's fascinating to see how what was a joke seem to have permeated into real life. For example, it decreed that there be no more pasta, as it caused lassitude, pessimism and lack of passion - how many people expound carb-free living these days? It also proposed that food would arrive rapidly and contain many flavours, but only a few mouthfuls in size - tasting menus, anyone? The most bizarre of the ideas, that food be experienced using all of the senses seems to have culminated in Heston Blumenthal's dish Sound of the Sea which requires one to listen to a recording of ocean waves whilst eating. Purely as a cultural artefact, the Futurist Cookbook makes my Top Ten.

Maria Elia

Chef

In 1932 Italian Futurist Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, proposed a revolution in food. Described by Elizabeth David as a 'publication of preposterous new dishes', The Futurist Cookbook is one of the most unusual books on food published during the twentieth century, written as an artistic endeavour, it flirted with Fascist ideals, and challenged all the rules of previous cooking. It is completely 'out of the box' awe inspiring and that's why I love it so!

Charlie Lee-Potter

Writer, broadcaster and academic

First published as a manifesto in the 1930s, these recipes are completely barmy. Eat an olive, kumquat and slice of raw fennel, while being sprayed with cologne, stroking sandpaper, silk and velvet with your left hand, and listening to Bach and aircraft noise. The Italian Futurists had objectionable political views, but I do admire their eccentricity.

Charles Michel

Chef and Food Researcher

Iqbal Wahhab

Iqbal Wahhab, OBE FRSA, Chief Executive Officer, Roast