Method

To make a dry bishop,* chop up 3 pounds of sugar as for tea. Scrape the zest off Seville oranges (it is impossible to say exactly how many) with the pieces of sugar until the sugar is yellow on all sides. Scrape the yellowed sugar onto a plate and continue rubbing the oranges with the sugar pieces until all the sugar has been yellowed and used up. Moisten the saturated sugar powder with orange juice until it is the consistency of kissel** Pour the mixture into a jar and store in a dry place. When bishop is wanted, dilute with Malaga, according to taste, and serve.

*This recipe is related to the English drink of the same name. The English version calls for clove-studded oranges to be steeped in hot port with sugar and other spices. The earliest attested English-language reference is Swift’s, who wrote in 1738, “[Oranges] well-roasted, with sugar and wine in a cup. They’ll make a sweet bishop.” In 1801 Coleridge referred to “Spicy bishop, drink divine (Oxford English Dictionary, 1, 878–879.)

**This direction is not very helpful since kissels can vary in consistency from stiff to semi-liquid. They can also quiver like molded gelatin. See recipes for examples.

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