Candied Eryngoes

Method

β€˜The manner to condite Eryngoes. Refine the sugar fit for the purpose, and take a pound of it, the white of an egge, and a pint of cleere water, boile them together and scum it, then let it boile until it be come to good strong syrup, and when it is boiled, as it cooleth, adde thereto a saucer full of Rose-water, a spoone full of Cinnamon water, and a graine of Muske, which have been infused together the night before, and now strained; into which syrup being more than halfe cold, put in your roots to soke and infuse until the next day; your roots being ordered in manner hereafter following:

These your roots being washed and picked, must be boiled in faire water by the space of foure houres, until they be soft, then must they be pilled cleane, as ye pill parsneps, and the pith must bee drawne out at the end of the root; and if there be any whose pith cannot be drawne out at the end, then you must split them, and so take out the pith: these you must also keepe from much handling, that they may be cleane, let them remaine in the syrup till the next day, and then set them on the fire in a faire broad pan until they be verie hot, but let them not boile at all: let them have their remaine over the fire an houre or more, removing them easily in the pan from one place to another with a wooden slice. This done, have in readinesse great cap or royall papers, whereupon you must strew some sugar, upon which lay our roots after that you have taken them out of the pan. These papers you must put into a Stove, or hot house to harden; but if you have not such a place, lay them before a good fire. In this manner if you condite your roots, there is not any that can prescribe you a better way. And thus may you condite any other root whatsoever, which will not onely be exceeding delicate, but very wholesome, and effectuall against the diseases above named.’

This recipe comes from John Gerard’s Herball, 1633. The roots take on the delicate flavour of the rose water.

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