The Kitchen

Appears in

What Shall We Have To-Day? 365 Recipes for All the Days of the Year

What Shall We Have To-Day? 365 Recipes for All the Days of the Year

By X. Marcel Boulestin

Published 1932

  • About
It is not necessary in order to cook well and to make all sorts of apparently complicated dishes to have a large kitchen with a thousand pans, elaborate gadgets and what is called “every modern improvement.” First of all, a small kitchen is much less tiring to work in, as you can actually put your hand on anything you want without walking round a table or running to a dresser. In fact, you ought to be able, without moving, to take things from the table to the range.
The range must be one to which you can soon become accustomed. A coal range is still, without any doubt, the best to use, but this of course is not always possible. The best kind of gas cooker is the one with a covered-in top forming a hot-plate; but by careful manipulation of the jets one can get quite good results on an ordinary gas stove.