Tomato Confit

Preparation info

  • Difficulty

    Easy

  • Makes

    24

Appears in

The Bacon Bible

The Bacon Bible

By Peter Sherman and Stephanie Banyas

Published 2019

  • About

I have a love-hate relationship with these tomatoes. I love them because they are just the best tomato you’ll ever eat. Concentrated flavor, sweet and a little tart with a hint of thyme ... so damn good. Too good! Which is why I hate them. They are bit on the labor-intensive side, and even if you make a ton, you still end up going through them quickly because you’ll want to put them on everything. Some of my favorite ways to use them are in my Wedge Salad, Skillet Pasta Carbonara, and BLT Panzanella.

Ingredients

  • Ice water
  • 12 Roma tomatoes
  • 1 cup (240 ml) extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

Method

Preheat the oven to 200°F (93°C). Line a half sheet pan with a Silpat or parchment paper.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Cut a small X on the bottom of each tomato.

Put the tomatoes in the boiling water and cook until the skin just begins to wrinkle, about 20 seconds. Plunge into the ice water and let sit until cold. Remove the skin from the tomatoes, halve them lengthwise, and remove the seeds. Put on the prepared baking sheet, cut-side up.

In a small bowl, whisk together ⅓ (75 ml) of the oil, the garlic, and thyme and evenly spoon the mixture over the tomato halves. Sift the sugar over the tomatoes and sprinkle with the salt. Bake the tomatoes for about 3 hours, until shriveled and dry but with a little juice left inside. (This could take more or less time depending on the size of your tomatoes. Begin checking after 1½ hours.)

Let the tomatoes cool to room temperature, then transfer to a bowl or jar with a tight-fitting lid. Cover the tomatoes with the remaining olive oil and the oil left from the baking sheet and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. You can use the tomato oil to cook scrambled eggs or to create a simple tomato vinaigrette with a splash of balsamic, if desired.