Lemon Fromage with Blueberries

Preparation info

  • 6

    servings
    • Difficulty

      Easy

Appears in

New York Times Menu Cookbook

New York Times Menu Cookbook

By Craig Claiborne

Published 1966

  • About

Ingredients

  • 3 whole eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • cup sugar
  • Grated rind of 1 lemon
  • ¾ tablespoon unflavored gelatin
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 pint blueberries, washed well and sweetened to taste

    Method

    1. Beat the eggs and egg yolks until lemon-colored and frothy. While beating, add the sugar in a slow stream and continue to beat until mixture is thickened. Add the grated rind.

    2. Combine the gelatin and lemon juice in a heatproof measuring cup. Place the cup over hot water and stir until gelatin dissolves. Add it to the egg mixture and beat well.

    3. Whip the cream until it is stiff and fold it gently into the egg and lemon mixture. Pour the mixture into a one-quart mold and chill for four hours. Unmold and serve with the sweetened blueberries.

    The proof of a pudding may be in the eating but it is certainly not in the defining. There must be few things in the world of food so difficult to categorize.

    The earliest puddings were encased in the tripe of one animal or another. The most famous of these is the haggis, which Scots are said to dote on, a substantial dish made with the heart, liver and lights of a sheep or calf.

    As civilization progressed, puddings of various kinds came to be enjoyed, both savory (as a main dish) and sweet (as a dessert), and following the early method of preparation, most of them were steamed or boiled in a bag or cloth. In the broadest sense a pudding may be made from almost any edible, including meats, fruits, or vegetables, and seasoned at will. The present multitude of dessert puddings includes plum pudding, rice pudding and, the most commonplace of all, bread pudding. Today a pudding can still be so called even if it is not steamed in a bag. It may be baked in a casserole or cooked on top of the stove, or it may even be a cold dish. Hot puddings are excellent fare for winter menus.