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What Shall We Have To-Day? 365 Recipes for All the Days of the Year

What Shall We Have To-Day? 365 Recipes for All the Days of the Year

By X. Marcel Boulestin

Published 1932

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There is no doubt about it, bad ordering is often responsible for a bad meal, either in a house or in a restaurant, and the final impression of excellence may be spoilt by the deplorable arrangement of dishes, dishes, mark you, perfectly good each of them taken separately.
Yet the rules are easy to remember, just as they are easily forgotten, so the whole matter is not really as simple as it seems. Indeed, it all comes to this; the dishes must make a contrasting effect.
If you have a cream soup, do not have afterwards a fish with a white sauce; do not make two dishes with a sharp taste follow each other; arrange your menu in a way which means that maximum of effect on the dinner table, and the minimum of work in the kitchen. Your cook must not have too much to do at the same time; do not, for instance, have several things fried, or two dishes which require an oven at two different temperatures.