Pomegranate Humus with Spicy Sausage

Sucuklu Humus

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Preparation info

  • Serves

    6

    • Difficulty

      Easy

Appears in

Anatolia

By David Dale and Somer Sivrioglu

Published 2015

  • About

A well-made humus is a wonderful form of comfort food. But it’s not Turkish. If you’re offered it in Turkey you’re probably in a place run by someone with an Arabic background. (This is not to say that I’m taking a side in the humus war. You won’t catch me making a declaration on whether its origin is Syrian or Israeli or Palestinian or Lebanese. All I know is it’s not Turkish.)

At my restaurant in Sydney, we try to change our menu every three months. The discussion with my cooks and waiters begins with me saying: ‘Lets lose the humus—it’s not Turkish.’ My manager, Fatih, always replies: ‘Leave it alone. It’s been seven years, and the customers love it.’ So I’ve compromised. I’ve turned an Arabic speciality into a Turkish dish by adding ingredients familiar to me— pomegranates to sweeten it, capsicum to colour it and sucuk (spicy beef sausage) to give it heat. My customers are right.

Ingredients

    Method