Tea-Smoked Duck

 

Preparation info

  • Makes

    6

    Servings
    • Difficulty

      Complex

Appears in

Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking

By Eileen Yin-Fei Lo

Published 2009

  • About

Throughout China, fowl are smoked, often over fragrant woods, more often over tea leaves. It is thought that smoking ducks and other fowl originated in Fujian, a region known for its cultivation of many different types of tea. The dish, however, has long been called camphor-smoked duck, despite the fact that tea, not camphor, was, and is, used. In Sichuan, chicken is often smoked over tea leaves flavored with jasmine flowers, over cypress wood, or over both. But the most highly regarded version of smoked duck is the one prepared with the green tea leaves of Hangzhou. The tea, Long Jing, or Dragon Well, is one of China‛s most famous, and its use in this preparation is a tradition of many centuries. As the tea leaves smolder, the duck is flavored. The dish is notable as well because it employs four different cooking processes: steaming, smoking, roasting, and deep-frying.

Ingredients

Method