Elizabeth Schneider

Elizabeth Schneider

Food Journalist and Cookbook Author

Elizabeth Schneider began her food career in the test kitchen, developing recipes for magazines such as Gourmet, Family Circle, and Food & Wine. A generalist at first, she discovered a deep interest in edible plants, cultivated and wild. To explore this, she worked closely with scientists, growers, foragers, chefs, and homemakers worldwide. She went on to spend three decades demystifying fruits, vegetables, grains, and mushrooms. Hundreds of her articles have appeared in popular and professional periodicals, notably the "Produce Pro" series (in Food Arts magazine) and "Vegetable Wise" (in Eating Well). Honors include four James Beard journalism and book awards, the Food Arts Silver Spoon, and membership in Les Dames d’Escoffier and Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America. Her last book, Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini, was the IACP Book of the Year (2003) and won the Jane Grigson Award for Distinguished Scholarship. Now retired, she divides her time between New York and Paris.

Elizabeth's collections

Highlights from Amaranth to Zucchini

There's hardly a vegetable on Earth that escapes author Elizabeth Schneider's scrutiny in her detailed and meticulously researched masterwork, 'Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini.' This is just a selection of the dishes that give due attention to lesser-known vegetables – and all are worth getting to know in your kitchen. Find out more about this book in our Behind the Cookbook feature.

Elizabeth Schneider

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Features & Stories

Behind the Cookbook: Vegetables From Amaranth to Zucchini

Behind the Cookbook: Vegetables From Amaranth to Zucchini

Elizabeth Schneider’s Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini, now celebrating its twentieth anniversary, is as relevant today as it was when it was first published. In a piece written exclusively for ckbk, the author reflects on how much – and how little – the food world has changed since the book’s publication.
When made from scratch is better than store-bought

When made from scratch is better than store-bought

Many cookbooks kick off with an introductory chapter, running through the kitchen basics and store cupboard essentials which will be among the building blocks to let you create the dishes within.But what about the basics themselves. Should you be happy with finding the best quality you can from a reliable producer? Might there not be benefits to making these basics own from scratch, too?

Elizabeth's favorite cookbooks

Michael Field's Cooking School

Michael Field's Cooking School

By Michael Field

Young and newly married, I cooked my way through this wholly reliable compendium of classics, from vegetables a la grecque to boeuf bourguignon to lemon souffle. Michael Field taught basic principles, techniques, and good taste through his careful step-by-step directions. With this cooking school as guide (complemented by Mastering the Art of French Cooking), I developed a love of small dinner parties that continues to the present.

The Encyclopedia of Fish Cookery

The Encyclopedia of Fish Cookery

Since 1978 this volume has answered more of my questions about seafood than any other. I have many books on seafood and many questions, but this is where I go most often (along with Alan Davidson’s North Atlantic Seafood).

The Victory Garden Cook Book

The Victory Garden Cook Book

By Marian Morash

This excellent basic guide to vegetables is as much about gardening as cooking--for those fortunate enough to be able to grow their own. For me, it was the first all-vegetable volume that planted the seed that grew into my own specialization in the plant kingdom. It treats admirably, alphabetically, and simply, a broad spectrum of vegetables, providing sound advice for the selection, storage, and cooking of common and some uncommon produce.

Available on ckbk now
Hoppin John’s Lowcountry Cooking

Hoppin John’s Lowcountry Cooking

By John Martin Taylor

A long friendship with John brings this to mind, but what keeps it there is more. One can sense his deep historical knowledge and feel his years of experience gardening, fishing, and cooking in this unique Southern region. With warmth, verve, and erudition—and recipes to match--he tells the tale of a place, its people, and the meaning of what they cultivate and eat.

Cooking from the Garden

Cooking from the Garden

By Rosalind Creasy

This big, beautiful book brought home to me the true meaning of "seed to table." Rosalind Creasy communicates the joys of edible landscaping through the colorful gardens that she designs, cultivates, photographs, writes about, and cooks from. Along with plans for themed gardens and sources for their creation, she profiles seedsmen, gardeners, and chefs nationwide (all of whom share recipes). Their stories led me to a network of interrelated growers and cooks who enriched the many articles I subsequently wrote about fruits, vegetables, and grains

Whole Grains Every Day Every Way

Whole Grains Every Day Every Way

By Lorna Sass

I serve grains and greens almost every night. Although easy to prepare, grains are finicky about the way they’re cooked and will muck up without careful attention. For the best advice on how to cook just about every whole grain, I always turn to this useful and straightforward book. I have consulted it of late to remind myself how best to cook quinoa, teff, short-grain brown rice, green spelt, farro, and Chinese black rice.

Available on ckbk now
Classic Home Desserts

Classic Home Desserts

By Richard Sax

I’m not a big dessert-fancier, but when there’s company, I often I turn to this truly comprehensive collection. As rich in lore as in technical advice, it is a pleasure to meander through its tales as well as its enormous repertoire of un-fussy recipes. Biscotti and cornmeal cakes are favorites, and I have sweet memories of enjoying both with Richard as he tested recipes in his New York City loft.

A Cordiall Water

A Cordiall Water

By MFK Fisher

I choose this small gem to represent M.F.K. Fisher, whose graceful words have taught us about the deep meanings of food. Here are potions and philters to cure what ails you, balm for body and spirit. This poetic and touching “Garland of Odd and Old Receipts to Assuage the Ills of Man & Beast” accomplishes what it promises.

Bitter

Bitter

By Jennifer McLagan

Although this book is brand-new to me, I can’t resist adding it. The recipes are so much to my taste that I don’t need to have tested them to be sure. McLagan’s use of unexpected techniques and surprising flavor combinations reveals the pleasures of bitterness as her knowledgeable voice instructs and charms.